biobased products

Congress ‘Eco Innovations from Biomass’

We would like to inform you about the congress “Eco Innovations from Biomass” in Papenburg, Germany, from 28 to 29 June 2017. As main topics of the congress, the prospects of bioeconomy and the relevance of biomass in the national and international context will be discussed. Furthermore, regional strategies for action, good practice bottom-up concepts and latest knowledge of research centers and industry concerning bio refining and Biobased products will be presented.

On the evening of 29 June, the 6th Lower Saxony Algae Round Table will take place. A separated registration is required.

The Programme can be found here.

We are looking forward to meeting you at the Eco Innovation Congress!

Exchange of knowledge

The aim of the congress is to provide an international platform for the exchange of knowledge about the bio-economy in the non-food sector and to discuss strategies for an efficient material utilization and energy recovery from biomass and residues according to the concept of a closed substance cycle. Presentations will be made on successful bottom-up concepts and current findings from research and practice concerning new green routes, biomaterials, biorefining, procedures for recovering nutrients and algae production as well as paludicultures. Companies will present »eco-innovative« product developments.

Companies, knowledge and research institutes are kindly invited to submit posters or to participate as exhibitors.

Essential role for biomass

In order to achieve the global and national climate protection targets by 2050 special efforts are required by all sectors of the economy. Sustainable and eco-friendly products and procedures on the basis of biomass and residues play an essential role in this context. The bio-economy in the non-food sector promotes these innovative developments since they provide remarkable opportunities for companies of different industries, such as new products and services but also new customers and markets. In addition to the presentations there will be poster exhibitions and opportunities for networking with different discussion forums.

Organised by…

The congress is organised by 3N Kompetenzzentrum Niedersachsen Netzwerk Nachwachsende Rohstoffe und Bioökonomie e.V. in cooperation with the Lower Saxony Chamber of Agriculture.

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Finalists of bio-based material award named

The six finalists of the Bio-based Material of the Year award, presented by the nova-Institute for Ecology and Innovation to those developing new applications and markets for bio-based products (those derived from living organisms), have been named.

The competition focuses on new developments in these areas, which have had (or will have) a market launch in 2014 or 2015.

Six candidates from companies in the United Kingdom, the United States and Germany have been chosen by a jury consisting of representatives of the nova-Institute, the advisory board, and sponsors and partners of the International Conference on Bio-based Materials (which will be held in Cologne between 13-15 April) from 24 submissions, and one winner and two runners up will go on to be awarded a certificate and receive a directory listing on the nova-Institute website.

The six nominated companies and products are:

Bayer MaterialScience ‘Desmodur eco N’

A bio-based polyurethane (made from polyisocyanate based on pentamethylene diisocyanate) cross-linker for high-performance automotive coatings. It enables the production of bio-based polyurethanes for the coating of cars, providing weather resistance, the ‘self-healing’ of superficial scratches and ‘great optical properties’.

EcoTechnilin ‘FibriRock’

A bio-sourced composite for aircraft applications. The lightweight, fast-curing composite is made from flax, basalt yarns, and sugar-based bioresin and is suitable for aircraft and rail applications and will go into production this year in a lightweight galley cart.

Evonik Industries

A bio-based polyamide 12 made from kernel oil 12 – This material can be used in high-performance products such as motor vehicles and large-volume pipes.

HIB Trip Part Solutions ‘Nature 50’

A hemp-based reinforced plastic. The granulate can be used in injection moulding for a range of applications, including those in the automotive sector.

Invista ‘Lycra T 162R Fibre’

A bio-derived spandex made using renewable butanediol. Approximately 70 per cent comes from the renewable resource meaning fabrics and garments can be made with reduced carbon and fossil fuel footprints.

twoBEars ‘bioFila’

A biodegradable polymer based on lignin. The biopolymer compound has optic and haptic properties and can be used for 3D printing.

Each of the six companies will now give a short presentation at the International Conference on Bio-based Materials, and the three winners will be decided by a vote of those attending the conference.

Source: resource.co

Introduction of bio-based polyTHF

Chemical giant BASF has begun commercial production of polytetrahydrofuran (polyTHF) derived entirely from biomass feedstocks. The process hinges on a microbial fermentation of sugars to produce 1,4-butanediol (BDO), which is then purified and polymerised.

Genetically engineered bacteria

BASF has licensed the BDO fermentation process from biotech specialist Genomatica, which genetically engineered the bacteria to produce and excrete BDO in sufficient quantity and purity.

PolyTHF is primarily used as a component in polyester and polyurethane materials.

“The bio-based PolyTHF 1000 is identical in quality to the petrochemical-based product.” To say it is Andrej Brejc, director Renewable Diols from BASF’s Intermediates division (sales to third parties of about 2.8 billion euro in 2014), which has made bio-based Polytetrahydrofuran 1000 (PolyTHF® 1000) available for the first time. The chemical company headquartered in Ludwigshafen is now providing this intermediate to selected partners for testing various applications in a large scale.

Opportunity for renewable raw materials

According to Brejc, “the opportunity to expand the range of products and applications made from renewable raw materials allows us and our partners to further explore the long-term market acceptance of this innovative technology.”

BASF is the world’s leading provider of PolyTHF, which is primarily used to make elastic spandex fibers for a large variety of textiles, including underwear, outerwear, sportswear and swimsuits. PolyTHF 1000 is mainly applied as a chemical building block for thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is used to make for example parts of ski boots and skates, shoe soles and instrument panel skin for automotive applications as well as hoses, films and cable sheathing.

It is also used as a component of thermoplastic polyetheresters and polyetheramides. Other applications include cast elastomers, which are used, for example, for the production of wheels for skateboards and inline skates.

Source: ilbioeconomista.com
 

Hempcrete: How industrial hemp is making construction greener

In the construction industry, everything is starting to look a little greener – the windows, the lights, the plumbing, and the heating and cooling systems. So it should come as no surprise that engineers have been dabbling in a more eco-friendly version of insulation too. It’s commonly known as hempcrete, and it’s changing the way our buildings retain temperature and conserve energy.

What is Hempcrete?

Hempcrete is an insulation alternative that mixes industrial hemp fibers and binders that resemble concrete to serve as the protective envelope inside a building. It is a mix of hemp hurds and lime, but possibly also contains natural sand, pozzolans, and cement. Hemp is a key crop in Manitoba, and it is most commonly used there to produce oil and seed. Hemp is also commonly used to make fabric and paper.

Building experts have developed a method for mixing the leftover wood core with water and binders to form hempcrete. In recent years, hempcrete has been catching on as a building material in Europe, where hempcrete buildings stand ten stories tall. Today, it is also marketed under the names Canobiote, Isochanvre, and Canosmose.

How Hempcrete Works

The industrial hemp core has a high silica content, allowing it to bind well with lime. This material is lightweight – about a seventh of the weight of actual concrete. Not only can hempcrete be used in the structure of buildings, but it also acts as insulating infill between frames. Loads are carried by internal wood stud framing, making it a popular option for low-rise construction.

Environmental Benefits of Hempcrete

Many eco-friendly builders praise hemp as a material because it’s a fast-growing crop and it can grow well in both tropical and temperate climates. It’s also considered to be an eco-friendly crop because it absorbs carbon dioxide as it grows. Hempcrete is considered to be a more eco-friendly material than traditional insulation, which is made of hydrofluorocarbons and can actually produce potent greenhouse gases.

Construction Benefits of Hempcrete

Based on research findings, hempcrete has the ability to manage moisture inside walls and store heat energy.

“Hempcrete is used as an environmental barrier for providing resistance to heat transfer and managing moisture of the building envelope,” said Kris J. Dick, an associate professor in the Department of Biosystems Engineering at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg and director of Alternative Village, its construction research facility. “Engineers and architectural designers practicing in the field of nonconventional material applications have clearly indicated a need for more design data regarding hempcrete.”

Hempcrete Testing

To test the durability and longevity of hempcrete in modern buildings, engineers have developed testing methods to evaluate its safety and efficiency. Alternative Village’s Kris J. Dick conducted research within a 23.8-square meter to compare hempcrete to traditional insulation in terms of energy, thermal and moisture performance. The results of his study indicated that the hempcrete provided a stable temperature inside the wall and that temperatures were consistent throughout the wall.

To broaden its mass appeal in the industry, however, more development and testing are needed to improve hempcrete’s structural strength. Experts are also beginning to consider other hemp-like natural materials that could be utilized for alternative insulation purposes as well.

Source: VIATechnik, LLC (via Linkedin)

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